Separatist leader bombed

DONETSK - He was a local boy from coal-dusted Donetsk who grew up to be a mine engineer. Aleksandr Zakharchenko, 42, quit that life to become a separatist warlord whose Russia-backed insurgents carved out a 'republic' roughly the size of the state of Delaware.   On Aug 31, a bomb ripped through a popular Donetsk cafe, killing Zakharchenko as he dined with several others. (RFE)
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  • Leader of DPR killed
  • Most likely culprits
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  • Russian intervention in Ukraine
  • War in Donbass
  • Donetsk People's Republic
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