Wednesday, June 26, 2019

Massive turnout at Hong Kong protest keeps heat on Chinese

Hong Kong’s chief executive apologized to the public on Sunday after a surprisingly large and defiant crowd poured onto the streets and converged on government offices. The protest capped a week of heated protests and soul-searching questions about the city’s ability to maintain some semblance of autonomy from mainland China. (National Post)

Former PM’s involvement in China dispute not helpful, but predictable

Former Prime Minister Jean Chrétien made headlines this week when he suggested Canada should ease tensions with the People’s Republic of China (PRC) by essentially breaking the law and releasing Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou who was arrested in Vancouver at the request of the U.S. government. (True North)

CSIS destroyed secret file on Pierre Trudeau 30 years ago stunning historians

OTTAWA - Canada’s spy service destroyed a Cold War dossier on Pierre Trudeau in 1989 instead of turning it over to the national archives. The Canadian Security Intelligence Service says the secret file on the former prime minister was scrapped because it fell short of the legal threshold for retention by either the service or the archives. (The Province)

Shield Girl: The face of the Hong Kong anti-extradition protests

Darkness had fallen. Crowds were thinning. A lone girl, in a meditative pose, defiantly sat in front of a row of riot police. It has become an iconic image from the Hong Kong demonstrations. "Bravery in the face of brutality. Beautiful," wrote an observer on Twitter. (BBC)

More than a million march in Hong Kong protesting extradition and eroding freedoms

HONG KONG - Hundreds of thousands of people filled the sweltering streets of Hong Kong on Sunday in an immense protest against fraying freedoms that culminated after midnight with the police firing pepper spray and striking participants with batons. (National Post)

This scientist proved climate change isn’t causing extreme weather so politicians attacked

This week in Vancouver, Prime Minister Trudeau said the federal carbon tax, a key pillar in his government’s climate policy, will help protect Canadians from extreme weather. “Extreme weather events are extraordinarily expensive for Canadians, our communities and our economy,” he said, citing the recent tornadoes in Ottawa and wildfires in Western Canada. “That’s why we need to act.” (Financial Post)

The good, the bad, and the ugly of Surrey’s police plan

Now that Surrey Mayor Doug McCallum has finally released his vision for a new local police force, it’s time to break down the good, the bad and the ugly of his master plan. (The Province)

Donald Trump joins Queen for 75th D-Day anniversary

World leaders, including US President Donald Trump, have joined the Queen in Portsmouth to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings. Theresa May is hosting 15 world leaders to honour the largest combined land, air and naval operation in history. (BBC)

RCMP shortages highlight government’s failures

Since last week’s opinion piece was published where I discussed the staffing shortages in the RCMP and how it was relative to crime concerns of folks who live in rural parts of the country, I have received a number of messages from people providing anecdotal snippets about service issues they are having or have had with the RCMP. (True North)

Canada can’t afford to let Huawei into our 5G networks

Amid Beijing’s trade war with Canada, the anxiety over the financial consequences of offending the Chinese Communist Party deepens. But would appeasing Beijing by allowing Huawei into our fifth-generation (5G) networks make real economic sense? (National Post)

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